Kitchen Tip: Baked Hard-Cooked Eggs

Kitchen Tip: Baked Hard-Cooked Eggs

Making some hard-cooked eggs this Easter weekend for coloring, egg hunts, or deviled eggs? Here’s a handy step by step on how to bake hard-cooked eggs in the oven. The results? Simpler, easier-to-peel (hooray! this is my least favorite part!) and softer texture (the whites aren’t rubbery). You can make as many dozen at a time as you have muffin pans. Amazing.

IMG 7860 Kitchen Tip: Baked Hard Cooked Eggs

Preheat oven to 325. Place a dozen eggs into a standard 12-count muffin pan. Bake for 25-30 minutes. Let stand 5 minutes.

IMG 7867 Kitchen Tip: Baked Hard Cooked Eggs

Place cooked eggs into a cold water bath. The eggshells may have some brown spots on them after baking, but these will wash off easily in the water.

IMG 7868 Kitchen Tip: Baked Hard Cooked Eggs

Let those babies take a nice cold bath until cooled through. Now they’re ready for coloring or peeling.

IMG 7869 Kitchen Tip: Baked Hard Cooked Eggs

Crack and peel your pretty eggs. Look, no gouges or shell marks from peeling. Just easy, perfect little eggs. You may find some small brown spots on the whites from baking.

IMG 7870 Kitchen Tip: Baked Hard Cooked Eggs

There you have it. Lovely little hard-cooked eggs. No grey rings around the yolk from over-cooking, either. They’re ready for your favorite deviled egg or egg salad recipe!  Like the fun texture on the egg? Use a serrated knife when slicing.

Happy Easter!

Kitchen Tip: Baked Hard-Cooked Eggs

Yield: 12 hard-cooked eggs

IMG 7859 Kitchen Tip: Baked Hard Cooked Eggs

Inspired by Alton Brown

Ingredients

  • 1 dozen eggs
  • 1 12-count standard muffin pan

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 325. Place 1 dozen eggs in muffin pan. Bake 25-30 minutes (mine took 25, this will depend on your oven). Place eggs in a cold water bath until cool. Peel.

Notes

Some brown spots may appear on shells and whites from baking. The shells will wash off easily in the water bath. Any brown spots on the whites will remain.

I peeled my egg (pictured) straight from the water bath. Peeling results may vary after coloring or refrigeration.

*The fresher the eggs are the more difficult they are to peel no matter what cooking method you use. If your eggs are quite fresh, I recommend hard boiling them in water with 1/2t of baking soda for easier peeling.

Schema/Recipe SEO Data Markup by ZipList Recipe Plugin
http://www.alaskafromscratch.com/2012/04/06/quick-tip-baked-hard-cooked-eggs/
 Kitchen Tip: Baked Hard Cooked Eggs

59 comments
danakx
danakx

I believe this is the recipe that first brought me to your site :-).  Fun to see it posted again.  I was originally looking for how to do this in my solar oven.  Although that was a success, I've been delighted to stay around and discover many more Florida-friendly recipes here (especially love the grapefruit and citrus ones). 

LisaCusumanoDubiansky
LisaCusumanoDubiansky

I baked my Easter eggs last year and they turned out perfect! No broken egg shells! So much better than boiling!

Alice Cooper
Alice Cooper

The brown spots aren't rust--they appear all over the egg, not just where it touches the pan. The eggs themselves "sweat" during the baking process, and the liquid is slightly sticky so I guess the albumin seeps through the shell when it's heated. The beads of moisture cook and turn brown, and a few of the brown spots go through the shell to the egg white. I haven't been able to eliminate the spots no matter what I've done--I used liners, placed a pan of water on another shelf, and switched to silicone pans.  There are always a few spots, but I don't mind for most uses.. Also when you are peeling the eggs, be sure you get the whole membrane off the white, as it does become a bit tough and affects the flavor if it's left on.

I've used this method probably 20 times now and it's so much easier than boiling. No sulfur smell in the house, either. Last week for the first time I had an egg "pop" near the end of the baking. It didn't explode and make an eggy mess, just the top half of the shell popped off and shattered. Once the oven was cool, it was very easy to just sweep the eggshell pieces out of the bottom of the oven. The egg yolk was fine, too--the white turned brown and a wee bit rubbery on the side that lost the shell, but the other half was okay. 

Elizabeth hoerske
Elizabeth hoerske

The best way to test this is to bake one egg to get the right temp and time. It works great! Everyone's oven is different my oven is from the 1970's (no convection oven)! The brown spots are coming from rust spots in your muffin pans. Just pop in some paper cupcake liners. I will never boil eggs again. 

Sara
Sara

I too had "brown spots" on both the outside of the shell and the inside once I peeled them. The spots did taste different and were a little tougher...almost like a skin. Next time I will reduce baking to 25 minutes, and line the muffin tin with the paper cups. The eggs peeled perfectly. I will definitely use this method again! Thank you. Sara

Cryssycat
Cryssycat

This worked perfectly for us. Thanks!

mary
mary

I recommend leaving the eggs that you want to cook on the counter for about a day or two. This ages the eggs and they are easier to peel regardless of your cooking method. 

jkontaxis
jkontaxis

not sure what i did wrong..... baked my not super fresh eggs, in a mini muffin pan,  at 325 for 30 minutes, did the ice bath,  and they werent all the way done and half of the whites came off..... 3 dozen eggs.... sadness

ArtistDNA
ArtistDNA

WHATEVER YOU DO, DONT EVEN TRY THIS!!! I almost ruined Easter by cooking them this way! Easier to take the shells off my ---- I had to throw out a dozen eggs and start over by boiling because the shells WOULD NOT come off!! So disappointed!

barbradonachy
barbradonachy

We live on a sailboat in the summer and are always looking for ways to reduce water usage. We'll try this method out this summer! Thanks for the post.

Greetings from north of the Arctic Circle.

grannykat
grannykat

Can this be down in high altitudes?


kat2166
kat2166

Thanks so much for this tip. I cooked the fresh eggs from my chickens (for deviled eggs) and a store bought dozen (white, for coloring) with your method. The eggs came out great! I cooked them at 325 for 25 minutes. This was the easiest time I've ever had peeling my fresh-from-the-chicken eggs. I may never boil an egg again!

Thanks again,

Kat

TeresaLinzmeier
TeresaLinzmeier

I still had some crack is this normal?  This just seemed so easy though. Love it!

Thank you

Friendlybbw
Friendlybbw

We tried this using silicone cupcake/muffin pans and were not successful. Only 30 out of 48 eggs were usable.

Sometime in the future I will try a dozen in metal pans.

Susan Simpson
Susan Simpson

Will this work using the silicone cupcake pans?

JulieKemper
JulieKemper

wow! Where has THIS method been? I tried it and I'm going to use it from now on!! GREAT!


Gon4mars
Gon4mars

I followed the directions to a T and two of my eggs exploded!! I was super scared taking them out, what did I do wrong?

nikkidt
nikkidt

Can you do this with only 4 or 5 eggs?

Butch Monkman
Butch Monkman

They say a old egg after boiling , will peel easier  than a fresh egg. Maybe during the holiday, set eggs aside for two or three weeks in the refrigerator.

Calypso98
Calypso98

I just tried this today - was a little concerned because all I had was organic, brown eggs, but they came out perfect! First time ever I've been able to make good hard-boiled eggs. Thanks for posting!

Tedi
Tedi

Came across this on Pinterest and I am curious - do the eggs have to be room temperature? I know putting cold eggs into hot water causes cracking. Great idea! I can't wait to try it out

Skeeter
Skeeter

Worked great for peeling :) Just have to figure out how to not getting the burnt spots / lil yellowish. Not a big deal if making egg salad. Love the way they get a little flat on the bottom ( going to make those cute little chick deviled eggs ) Will never boil again !!

Pearl2006
Pearl2006

I had some eggs that were getting ready to expire so I am trying this method right now. I have an infant so its hard to cook and watch the boiling eggs etc, this way i can throw them in the oven and put my timer on. *** HINT *** on how to tell if an egg is done- for those who have issues seeing if they are done or not. Take the egg and try to spin it on the counter top, if it spins nicely its done! If it wobbles its not done yet. Give it a try before you even put your eggs in the oven, spin it, it will not spin!

Terra Baltosiewich
Terra Baltosiewich

I found you on Pinterest, and love love this idea!!!! What a great idea. I will be doing this for sure this weekend:-) Take care, Terra

mnmom
mnmom

I was excited to try this because I hate peeling eggs. Unfortunately it wasn't any different than boiling them for us. :( We baked 3 dozen and are about 1/2 way through peeling them. The whites are coming off with the shells. We followed the directions exactly so I'm not sure what went wrong. We are using brown, organic eggs.

Shirl
Shirl

I will try this. And if it works I will use my cupcake trick: Rather than a muffin tin, use canning lids on a cookie sheet. You can lots more in a batch.

The Fruitbat
The Fruitbat

Tried the baking of the egg the other day when they where cooled I peeled off the shell and the white of the eggs where yellowish any ideas why????? It is the easy ways to make 9 dozen DEVILED Eggs please let me know if anyone else has had these issues thanks

PizzaQueen31
PizzaQueen31

After the eggs cooled I peel of the shell the whites of the eggs where not white they where yellowish any one else with this issue or any ideas why Please let me know thanks

alaskafromscratch
alaskafromscratch moderator

Oh dear, that is sadness! :( so sorry to hear that. I'm beginning to wonder if the type of oven might make a difference (for example, conventional vs. convection or gas vs. electric). All the best.

AmandaSavage
AmandaSavage

@ArtistDNA  I do this all the time and have had no issue. I do know it helps greatly to give them an ice bath instead of just cold water. Usually once cooked I put them in a bowl of water and into the freezer for 10-15 minutes and the shells come off very nicely, every time.

alaskafromscratch
alaskafromscratch moderator

@kat2166 Awesome! Thank you so much for letting us know, especially about your results with the fresh eggs! :) Happy Easter!

alaskafromscratch
alaskafromscratch moderator

@TeresaLinzmeier Hi Teresa! So pleased that you tried this and liked it! :)  As for cracking, I have found that if there is already an existing weakness in the shell of the egg that it will crack during cooking, whether it's boiled the traditional way or baked in the oven. I've had it happen a couple of times, so I'd say it's pretty normal. Hope this helps! I'm about to bake a batch today myself! :)

alaskafromscratch
alaskafromscratch moderator

@JulieKemper I'm so happy that you tried this and were so pleased with the results! :) Thanks for letting me know. 

alaskafromscratch
alaskafromscratch moderator

@Gon4mars I'm sure you didn't do anything wrong! I've never had this happen (just made a batch last week). It's hard to say what went wrong... could be the eggs or possibly the oven (does it ever run hot perhaps?). Sorry it didn't work out well for you. How did the rest of the eggs in the batch fair?

Alaska from Scratch
Alaska from Scratch

Hi Tedi! Thank you for your question. I have taken the eggs directly from the refrigerator to the pan and into the oven without any trouble with cracking. Hope this helps!

Skeeter
Skeeter

I wonder if I make them in cupcake paper .. also I used brown cagefree. Going to try a white egg, thinking the yellow comes from the brown eggs maybe. Not sure but I am willing to experiment to get perfection. Will let you know if I figure it out :)

tabithacarnes
tabithacarnes

Thanks for the tip! I am trying this out with some eggs that were on the brink of expiration (well, according to Pinterest they're good if they don't float in water when raw, and one of them floated while the rest touch the bottom just barely). I was wondering how I could tell when they're done in the oven, since I'm only cooking 7 of them and I was worried about going the full 25-30 minutes.

 

Update: They're cooling off in water now. One of them floated to the top after baking them...what does that mean?

Alaska from Scratch
Alaska from Scratch

Thank you for your feedback. I'm sorry to hear that you're having the same trouble peeling the eggs! I have heard that the fresher the eggs the more difficult they are to peel in general, but I've never tried this theory to see if it's true for this recipe. I'm wondering if that might be the case for your organic brown eggs (I love brown eggs!).

Alaska from Scratch
Alaska from Scratch

Hi Fruitbat, Thank you for your comment. I just got a similar comment from PizzaQueen31 today on the same issue, but before today had not had anyone report this. I'm beginning to wonder if the type of pan makes a difference? I'm going to make a batch tomorrow to go camping and I will experiment with some different things and see if any of mine turn yellow. Thanks!

Alaska from Scratch
Alaska from Scratch

Hi PizzaQueen31, Thank you for your comment. I've never had this happen and you are the first person to report this issue. I am very interested to find out why this happened as well. I hope we can get to the bottom of it.

Susie Cruisie
Susie Cruisie

@alaskafromscratch I have a combination oven and it definitely makes a difference if you use the convection setting instead of bake.  Convection circulates the hot air and makes the outside cook faster.  Great for making things extra crisp and cooking faster, but for baked goods, covered casseroles, etc, it will not work.  The slower bake cycle allows the heat to reach the inside of the food, where convection would cook the outside long before the center was done.  Roast veggies will be browned but rock hard, cakes will be golden on top and liquid in the middle, casseroles with a cover/foil will barely get hot inside, and eggs would indeed fail to cook--the shells could be burned brown and the eggs would still not get cooked all the way through.

Gon4mars
Gon4mars

@alaskafromscratch The rest were ok, with brown burnish spots where they touched the cupcake pan. I'm thinking my oven runs hot, will try 20-25 min instead of 30. Thanks!

Alaska from Scratch
Alaska from Scratch

I think cupcake papers are a great idea to try! Be sure and let me know how it turns out for you. Thank you for your comments and feedback. :)

silly you
silly you

@tabithacarnes when an egg floats in a bowl of water it means that gas has built up inside the shell and is making the egg more buoyant... this is the best way to test if your eggs are expired, when they float they are definitely questionable to eat.

BobbiePaytonPitman
BobbiePaytonPitman

There is absolutely no difference in taste between brown eggs and white eggs! It is the breed of CHICKEN who determines the color of the egg. A free-range farmer can own both white layers and brown layers. Brown egg layers typically eat more food(it's just the breed), therefore, the eggs can cost more to the consumer.  The difference in taste is the "flavoring" of the free-range eaters: weeds and bugs. I, personally, prefer the mild(some say bland) taste of the grain-fed chicken. We had chickens, but their job was 'bug control," and they did it well!

Bunny Lee Ryan
Bunny Lee Ryan

I have 5 hens and have always avoided boiling the eggs for hard boiled; just too hard to peel because of the freshness of the eggs. Store eggs are an average of 45 days old. Tried your method of baking and was very happy. I did get some yellowing on the white, wondered if it was because of the coated pan I baked them in but it's not a big problem. Now we will be able to cook our eggs in any fashion. Thanks so much!

Alaska from Scratch
Alaska from Scratch

I'm going to make a batch tomorrow and experiment with a few things and see if I can't figure this out. :)

Alaska from Scratch
Alaska from Scratch

Thank you very much for your input about the fresh eggs! Really appreciate your feedback. :)

Trackbacks

  1. [...] courtesy of Alaska from Scratch.com I like their use of the standard muffin tin. The directions are basically the same on both sites as [...]

  2. [...] To make the prefect hard-boiled egg each time, you actually do not boil it.  You bake it. The folks over at Alaska from scratch have the details.  Basically you put the eggs in a muffin tin and bake for 25 min. at 325.  Here are all the details: Alaskafromscratch [...]

  3. [...] Kitchen Tip: Baked Hard-Cooked Eggs – Alaska from ScratchAlaska from Scratch [...]

  4. [...] I searched around to find out how to make hard boiled eggs in the oven, and found a great how to at Alaska from Scratch! If you have not checked out this site it is a must, tons of great [...]

  5. [...] that week. This also an Easter egg game changer since you can do them 12 at a time for dyeing!! This is the recipe I used. But I figured I’d repost it [...]

  6. [...] soon as they’re cool enough to handle, then return them to the ice water to thoroughly chill.Baked Hard Cooked Eggs found on Alaska From [...]

  7. [...] like to also start getting more advanced with hard baked eggs, store & freeze soups and some crock pot [...]